clothing-rentalThere are definitely pro’s and con’s to renting out merchandise. Some vintage shops make a lot of money out renting out outfits for parties and events while others do not want anything to with it. I suppose how often you rent out product, or whether you do not do it all will really depend on the type of store you have.

If you have more of a costume shop, or a shop that caters more towards period pieces, you may want to get into the renting business. If you are more of a boutique, with one off pieces and styles then you may find that it is too much work to rent out outfits for individual customers. Day to day rentals may not be your thing, but you shouldn’t let that get in the way of renting out items to photographers or designers for free publicity.

members-only-adSince the 80s, Members Only jackets have been some of the both loved and hated icons throughout the years. While some people opt to wear vintage Members Only jackets for their nostalgic value, others have been quick to ridicule the brand and the people who wear it. Just watch the movie Shallow Hal and see Gwyneth Paltrow ask Jason Alexander if he’s the last member of the club when she sees him wearing a Members Only Jacket.

“When you put it on, something happens.” is the tagline that was so great that it got co-opted in the early 1990s and used by various condom makers.

The ubiquitous jackets were first introduced in 1981. They were available in a wide array of color choices. Given it was the 80s, after all, color was to be embraced and enjoyed.

membership-ad What does it mean to be a man? Is it the size of your quadraphonic hi-fi equipment or the fit of your flares? The Male Mystique presents a swinging vision of the ideal male-dominated lifestyle—at least, as seen through the looking-glass of men’s magazine ads of the 1960s and ’70s. This is Total Male Living as it was meant to be: a world of musk, whiskey, polyester slacks, “male comfort spray,” and, of course, babes. With 150 swaggering print advertisements presenting an astonishing array of swarthy delights, crass copy, and surprise celebrity sightings, The Male Mystique is tribute to the time when testosterone was in vogue and Stay-Prest stayed pants at the ready. Ladies, please don’t crush the velour.

zboysThe Zephyr surf team was the mafia of the waves, and that same toughness and independent spirit was manifested in their talent and angst on the pavement. Jeff and Skip nurtured and forged this young gaggle of waifs and strays, many from broken homes or no place to go, into the world’s best skaters. The kids all found their role at Jeff Ho’s shop– whether it was sweeping the floors or rolling joints for Jeff– everyone found a unique way, on their boards and in the shop, to contribute, complement, and propel the Z-boys forward and keep the team as a whole at the top of their game. It was a wild environment for a kid to grow-up in– legend has it there was plenty of pretty crazy shit going on back then behind closed doors that no one on the outside needed to know about.

why-we-buyRevolutionary retail guru Paco Underhill is back with a completely revised edition of his classic, witty bestselling book on our ever-evolving consumer culture—full of fresh observations and important lessons from the cutting edge of retail such as Internet behemoths Amazon and iTunes as well as the globalization of retail in the world’s emerging markets.
Is there a method to our madness when it comes to shopping? Hailed by the San Francisco Chronicle as “a Sherlock Holmes for retailers,” author and research company CEO Paco Underhill answers with a definitive “yes” in this witty, eye-opening report on our ever-evolving consumer culture. Why We Buy is based on hard data gleaned from thousands of hours of field research–in shopping malls, department stores, and supermarkets across America. With his team of sleuths tracking our every move, Paco Underhill lays bare the struggle among merchants, marketers, and increasingly knowledgeable consumers for control.

Creative window displays are an ideal way to set your business apart from the competition. Windows are the billboard of your store, They’re a place to emphasize your unique identity, advertise merchandise and catch the attention of shoppers.
So how do you make a traffic-stopping display? The possible subjects are endless, but the key is to focus on a product or theme, not simply exhibit a collection of items.

Following basic design principles will enhance your displays. Here’s some advice from professionals

momtattooComing up with a business name is one of your first steps when it comes to putting together your business. The first thing that you want to do is make sure that no one else is already using the name that you are hoping to use. There are a few different ways to go about finding out if are able to use the business name or not. If you find out that someone is already using it in your industry do not fear, you may just have to come up with another way of wording it.

frac-slderFrancoise Hardy was a wistful breath of fresh air during the sex, drugs & rock ‘n’ roll of the 1960s. Mysterious, sweetly naive, and utterly desirable. She was adored by Bob Dylan, Nick Drake, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, and more. The incredible enduring images of Hardy, particularly those by famed photographer Jean-Marie Perier (who shot her donned in Dior, Yves Saint Laurent, Andre Courréges, and Paco Rabanne), made her an instant and timeless style icon. With her faraway gaze and lazy smile, Francoise Hardy is like a melancholy dream that you simply don’t want to wake up from. Her unease with fame and adoration is at times clearly evident in her photos– serving only to make her even more alluring.

pants-addddPerhaps nothing (besides Volkswagen and Coke) illustrates the bold new advertising style of the late ’60s and early ’70s better than menswear brand H.I.S. Strong type. Great copy. Nick Nolte (who stars in the ad below).

The company was founded in New York in 1923 as “Honesdale Manufacturing Co.” by Henry I. Siegel from Lublin, Poland. In 1956, as an homage to his father, Jesse Siegel established the H.I.S brand, whose logo is composed of Henry I. Siegel’s initials set in Franklin Gothic, one of the most popular typefaces of the era.